Linux.


Billy Inglis <william.inglis72@...>
 

hi guys, right i have heard that Vinux is now finished, but is there a mailing list for the Linux platform?.
--
All The Best
Billy


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Since there are as many distros of linux as stars in the sky, as well as specialty lists regarding the kernel, etc., no one could possibly answer this question in a way that would lead you to a mailing list that you want to join.

Search engines are your friend:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=linux+mailing+list 

Start plowing through them, and if you have a particular distro in mind or want something else specific then add a search term or two.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

     The specialist knows more and more about less and less and finally knows everything about nothing.

             ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

Hi,

Technically, it is off-topic, but it’ll be allowed for the time being in hopes that it could serve as start of a search for people who needs it.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, April 26, 2019 6:10 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Linux.

 

Since there are as many distros of linux as stars in the sky, as well as specialty lists regarding the kernel, etc., no one could possibly answer this question in a way that would lead you to a mailing list that you want to join.

Search engines are your friend:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=linux+mailing+list 

Start plowing through them, and if you have a particular distro in mind or want something else specific then add a search term or two.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

     The specialist knows more and more about less and less and finally knows everything about nothing.

             ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


Devin Prater
 

Currently, there are a few distributions, (Distros) which are still being worked on, for the time being of course, for blind or visually impaired users.

Slint is based on Slackware, and the Homepage says it is “beginner friendly” which directly opposes Slackware’s ideas of what “keep it simple stupid” implementation actually means. I have installed it, and dealing with disks and partitions isn’t something that, in my oppinion, a newbie should have to do, but what do I know. A plus to this is that you’ll get a taste of what Linux is about, tinkering, breaking things, getting a system that you almost like, and discovering that a program you use isn’t made for Linux, or even worse, that it simply isn’t available in your package manager and is a pain to build (compile yourself from source code). Another plus for this, and all other Linux Distros, is that Voxin is available, so you can use it with Emacspeak, which is a joy to use. Just, not the rest of Linux…

Accessible Coconut is a soup of changes made to Ubuntu 18.04, which, by the version number, is indeed a year out of date. I have not tried it, nor do I want to, as Ubuntu has shown itself to have few up-to-date programs, and I will not accept that. Any operating system that comes out of date out of the gate is not one for me, even if it has a few bells and penny whistles, like braille entry through the keyboard. Unless it has BrailleBlaster, which I haven’t gotten workin on Linux, it’s not good personally, nor professionally. Speaking of professionalism, that’s one thing that a lot of Linux projects, like Speechd-el, don’t have. Ugh, just listen to the sound icons they use, and compare that to the comprehensive Emacspeak ones. Okay, off the soapbox and back to distros!

Talking Arch was a great distro for advanced users, but the creator has seen the light and moved on to Single Board Computers running the ARM processor, so cannot make builds for the rest of us and make sure they work. Consequently, the latest release was around two years ago.

The F123E project, which is carried in Google so I can’t find a link right now, is for the Raspberry Pi 3B+ computers. It is menu-driven, and pretty simplistic, only having a basic text editor, Mutt, and Links, with a few other text-based applications. It is mainly made for “emerging markets” of blind people, and is good at what it does. If you get this, and the $80 Pi and case, don’t expect much, really, or you’ll be disappointed. Emacspeak can’t run on it, it seems, as some eSpeak module can’t be found, and Voxin, being just the IBM ViaVoice on life support, being Intel 32-bit, hasn’t be designed to work on ARM hardware, and I doubt it ever will. I’m not sure what the good Doctor Raman will do when ARM computers become the norm. Oh, right, stockpile Intel X86-64 laptops because nothing sounds better than ViaVoice, which is just about true compared to eSpeak.

Vinux, and Sonar, tried to merge, and failed, so they’re both dead. Debian works well, if your hardware is supported by free software drivers. If not, well, there’s Ubuntu and don’t worry about how slowly it’s updated, users don’t need that roaming release stuff right? Right?

Fedora is also a good distribution, and the “Mate Spin” is the one I’d go with if I were to try, for the sixth time or so, to be productive and enjoy Linux. Spoiler: I probably won’t try it again; freedom is great, if you’re not just going from a popular, well-supported OS to the chains of an OS where no one outside of blind people actually care about supporting blind people, and of course applications are limited, ten-fold if you need those applications to be accessible. But if you ask hardcore Linux people, you’ll get “We don’t need games, we have work to do (that being configuring Linux as far as possible, trying to scratch that accessibility itch as well as possible), and if it’s not on Linux, make it yourself!”

So really, if you want something like Linux which you can actually be productive with, I’d suggest getting a Mac, or using the Windows Subsystem for Linux. Sure, you’re limited pretty much to terminal applications, but most blind people using the Linux GUI don’t use anything much else than Gedit (Notepad with spell checking), LibreOffice, Firefox, and Thunderbird. Some use Chromium, with Chromevox of course, which isn’t even supported by the developers on non-ChromeOS systems, because of course Orca, the Linux GUI screen reader, doesn’t work with Chrome.

In short, if you have an old computer laying around ready to die, sure, put Linux on it and marvel at its complexities, and the sweet call of freedom… with the chains of accessibility deficiencies attached of course. This isn’t to say that Linux is completely bad, Emacs and Emacspeak are beautiful tools, which are effective and complex, it's just that when you get outside of Emacs with Emacspeak, it's like you’ve left civilization, and now must wander the wilderness. Emacs, and Emacspeak, both work well on the Mac, though, so I don’t have the wilderness to wander through. Now if Emacspeak worked well on Windows, that’d be even better, although Visual Studio Code is proving to be an okay substitute.



On Apr 26, 2019, at 7:01 AM, Billy Inglis <william.inglis72@...> wrote:

hi guys, right i have heard that Vinux is now finished, but is there a mailing list for the Linux platform?.
--
All The Best
Billy





Brian Tew <briantew1951@...>
 

blinux-list@...
is for blind linux users, any ditribution.
blinux-list-subscribe@... 
to subscribe.
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