Is there a way to reestablish WI-FI connection without rebooting a PC in Windows 10?


Kevin Minor
 

Hi.

 

Thankfully, my new Asus Zenbook laptop isn’t as bad as my old PC, but occasionally it still happens. For some unknown reason I lose my WI-FI connection to my router, and the only way I know of to get it back is by rebooting the PC. It’s running the latest Windows 10, 2004. Is there a better way to reconnect to the router?

 

Thanks in advance for any help.

 

Kevin Minor, my girlfriend Valerie, and furry Jilly


David Goldfield
 

Kevin, when this happens to me I find that a quick way to reestablish the connection is to go to WiFi settings and turn WiFi off, then toggle it back on again.


David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org
On 8/2/2020 12:27 AM, Kevin Minor wrote:

Hi.

 

Thankfully, my new Asus Zenbook laptop isn’t as bad as my old PC, but occasionally it still happens. For some unknown reason I lose my WI-FI connection to my router, and the only way I know of to get it back is by rebooting the PC. It’s running the latest Windows 10, 2004. Is there a better way to reconnect to the router?

 

Thanks in advance for any help.

 

Kevin Minor, my girlfriend Valerie, and furry Jilly


Blaster
 

If you'd like to re-establish a Wi-Fi connection to your router
without rebooting the PC, try this:

On your keyboard, Press the windows key and tap the letter R key to
open a run command line.

Type the three letters cmd or the word command and press the enter key
to open the command prompt.

When it opens, Don't worry about the command prompt path that's
displayed, this will work from anywhere.

Type this command to clear your current connection:

ipconfig /release

then press the enter key to execute the command, this will bring you
back to the command prompt.

Now type this to re-connect:

ipconfig /renew

Then press the enter key to execute the command.

You don't need to wait for all of the detailed connection information
to display, just type:
exit and then press the enter key to exit the command prompt.

HTH,
Blaster

On 8/2/20, David Goldfield <david.goldfield@outlook.com> wrote:
Kevin, when this happens to me I find that a quick way to reestablish
the connection is to go to WiFi settings and turn WiFi off, then toggle
it back on again.


David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 8/2/2020 12:27 AM, Kevin Minor wrote:

Hi.

Thankfully, my new Asus Zenbook laptop isn’t as bad as my old PC, but
occasionally it still happens. For some unknown reason I lose my WI-FI
connection to my router, and the only way I know of to get it back is
by rebooting the PC. It’s running the latest Windows 10, 2004. Is
there a better way to reconnect to the router?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Kevin Minor, my girlfriend Valerie, and furry Jilly




Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 12:59 PM, Blaster wrote:
ipconfig /release
Not on my machine, and that's whether command prompt is being run with or without admin permissions.   This is what comes back from the command:
-----
 
Windows IP Configuration
 
No operation can be performed on Ethernet while it has its media disconnected.
No operation can be performed on Local Area Connection* 6 while it has its media disconnected.
No operation can be performed on Local Area Connection* 7 while it has its media disconnected.
An error occurred while releasing interface Intel AC 3165 Built-In : An address has not yet been associated with the network endpoint.
 
-----
and if I use WinKey+R, the command prompt does not stay open, but immediately closes.   I also get error messages for the renew option, which is not surprising.

It really depends on just how you're "disconnected" as far as using IPCONFIG goes.  You can lack internet connectivity, but still be connected as far as Windows is concerned.

Mr. Goldfield's method works more consistently, depending on exactly what's wrong.  Even that won't fix it if the issue is at the router and its connection to the outside world.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902


Blaster
 

Brian,
I believe you executed the commands properly and got the desired
results, You or others can correct me if I'm mistaken.

The /release switch is meant to remove your current session from the
router table and doesnt' return any text, unless you mis-type the
command and then you'd get a syntax error. If successfully executed,
it would return to the prompt as it did.

I believe the first block of text you posted is telling us you don't
have a USB thumb drive attached to your router for use as a network
storage device and all of these checks failed. So, I don't think this
really matters for what we're trying to do. As long as we didn't get a
networking error, I think we're okay.

The /renew switch signs you back into your router and post back the
status of your new session. It seems to give you the same network
storage error text posting first, But then you should get info like
your new IP address, DNS servers and other ethernet info.

Oh, and as far as the windows key and the letter R keys, I should have
said "press and hold" the windows key and "tap" the letter R key while
releasing the windows key to open a run command line, sorry about
that.

HTH,
Blaster

On 8/2/20, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 12:59 PM, Blaster wrote:


ipconfig /release
Not on my machine, and that's whether command prompt is being run with or
without admin permissions. This is what comes back from the command:
-----

Windows IP Configuration

No operation can be performed on Ethernet while it has its media
disconnected.
No operation can be performed on Local Area Connection* 6 while it has its
media disconnected.
No operation can be performed on Local Area Connection* 7 while it has its
media disconnected.
An error occurred while releasing interface Intel AC 3165 Built-In : An
address has not yet been associated with the network endpoint.

-----
and if I use WinKey+R, the command prompt does not stay open, but
immediately closes. I also get error messages for the renew option, which
is not surprising.

It really depends on just how you're "disconnected" as far as using IPCONFIG
goes. You can lack internet connectivity, but still be connected as far as
Windows is concerned.

Mr. Goldfield's method works more consistently, depending on exactly what's
wrong. Even that won't fix it if the issue is at the router and its
connection to the outside world.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient
premises.

~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902




tim
 

Brian was right in the info that came up.
You will get that info if the wireless or ethernet wire is not connected to the router.
That command is only for releasing and renewing the ip address between the computer and router. It will not connect the computer to the router. That is what a ethernet wire or wireless adapter does. Until that connection is made you will have 0.0.0.0 for a ip address and that is the same info Brian gave you..
To get that ip address you will need either a wired ethernet connection to router, or you can in network and sharing center using available networks in range.



Tim M




Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

The switch it off and on again, whether doing so in settings or using the appropriate internet connection device in Device Manager (disable then enable again), works perfectly.

One of the things I really miss is the ability to do this from the system tray.  It's been so long since I used a version of Windows that supported it, but you used to be able to bring up the context menu for a WiFi or other internet connection in the system tray and "refresh" it (I can't for the life of me recall the actual term used in the menu).  That process would do an intentional disconnect (if the connection was active), disable the device used to make it, then reenable that device again, after which it would reestablish a connection on its own.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902


Sarah k Alawami
 

I think I remember that way back in the xp days. I wonder if there is an app you can use for this? I just used the release and renew thing when I was needing to do this way back in the day.

--

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website.

Check out my adventures with a shadow machine.

to subscribe to the feed click here and you can also follow us on twitter

Our discord is where you will know when we go live on twitch. Feel free to give the channel a follow and see what is up there.

For stream archives, products you can buy and more visit my main lbry page and my tffp lbry page You will also be able to buy some of my products and eBooks there.

Finally, to become a patron and help support the podcast go here

On 3 Aug 2020, at 11:22, Brian Vogel wrote:

The switch it off and on again, whether doing so in settings or using the appropriate internet connection device in Device Manager (disable then enable again), works perfectly.

One of the things I really miss is the ability to do this from the system tray.  It's been so long since I used a version of Windows that supported it, but you used to be able to bring up the context menu for a WiFi or other internet connection in the system tray and "refresh" it (I can't for the life of me recall the actual term used in the menu).  That process would do an intentional disconnect (if the connection was active), disable the device used to make it, then reenable that device again, after which it would reestablish a connection on its own.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902


tim
 

Now that type of quick connect was possible with laptops, but not on desktops.
They even gave you a key or slide button . That would fix a lot of disconnect problems on desktops.

Tim M



On Aug 3, 2020, at 4:10 PM, Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@...> wrote:

I think I remember that way back in the xp days. I wonder if there is an app you can use for this? I just used the release and renew thing when I was needing to do this way back in the day.

--

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website.

Check out my adventures with a shadow machine.

to subscribe to the feed click here and you can also follow us on twitter

Our discord is where you will know when we go live on twitch. Feel free to give the channel a follow and see what is up there.

For stream archives, products you can buy and more visit my main lbry page and my tffp lbry page You will also be able to buy some of my products and eBooks there.

Finally, to become a patron and help support the podcast go here

On 3 Aug 2020, at 11:22, Brian Vogel wrote:

The switch it off and on again, whether doing so in settings or using the appropriate internet connection device in Device Manager (disable then enable again), works perfectly.

One of the things I really miss is the ability to do this from the system tray.  It's been so long since I used a version of Windows that supported it, but you used to be able to bring up the context menu for a WiFi or other internet connection in the system tray and "refresh" it (I can't for the life of me recall the actual term used in the menu).  That process would do an intentional disconnect (if the connection was active), disable the device used to make it, then reenable that device again, after which it would reestablish a connection on its own.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902



Roger Stewart
 

Actually it is still there but it takes a few more steps now. I can find my WI FI connection in the system tray. If I right click it, I can then open network settings and in there is an option to reset the network and that will do it.

Roger







On 8/3/2020 3:46 PM, tim wrote:
Now that type of quick connect was possible with laptops, but not on desktops.
They even gave you a key or slide button . That would fix a lot of disconnect problems on desktops.

Tim M



On Aug 3, 2020, at 4:10 PM, Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@...> wrote:

I think I remember that way back in the xp days. I wonder if there is an app you can use for this? I just used the release and renew thing when I was needing to do this way back in the day.

--

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website.

Check out my adventures with a shadow machine.

to subscribe to the feed click here and you can also follow us on twitter

Our discord is where you will know when we go live on twitch. Feel free to give the channel a follow and see what is up there.

For stream archives, products you can buy and more visit my main lbry page and my tffp lbry page You will also be able to buy some of my products and eBooks there.

Finally, to become a patron and help support the podcast go here

On 3 Aug 2020, at 11:22, Brian Vogel wrote:

The switch it off and on again, whether doing so in settings or using the appropriate internet connection device in Device Manager (disable then enable again), works perfectly.

One of the things I really miss is the ability to do this from the system tray.  It's been so long since I used a version of Windows that supported it, but you used to be able to bring up the context menu for a WiFi or other internet connection in the system tray and "refresh" it (I can't for the life of me recall the actual term used in the menu).  That process would do an intentional disconnect (if the connection was active), disable the device used to make it, then reenable that device again, after which it would reestablish a connection on its own.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902




Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Mon, Aug 3, 2020 at 06:02 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
If I right click it, I can then open network settings and in there is an option to reset the network and that will do it.
 
-
I can find that option in Settings, Network & Internet, Status Pane, Network Reset link (presuming that's what you're talking about) but, if I select it, the warning reads, "This will remove then reinstall all of your network adapters, and set other networking components back to their original settings. You might need to reinstall other networking software afterwards, such as VPN client software or virtual switches.  Your PC will be restarted."  It has a Reset now button.

If this is what you're making reference to, it is absolutely not what I had in mind, nor what I was trying to describe.  The old thing that could be invoked from the context menu for the network connection was not anywhere near to this aggressive.  It simply did what one can do by hand in Device Manager, disabling the network adapter and then reenabling it, forcing the connection to be reestablished from scratch afterward.  No software was removed and no restart of the computer was involved.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902